Today I am reviewing a Moonlight White Tea (Yueguangbai 月光白) from DiginTea.

I love tea. Not just drinking it, but I enjoy it’s history, culture, and community as well. I hadn’t heard of DiginTea before, but I saw them advertising on Reddit so I decided to reach out to them to see if they would like to be reviewed on this website. The owner introduced himself and offered me a generous discount, so I decided to take him up on the offer.

Tea Specifications

Brand: DiginTea
Tea: Yue Guang Bai (Moonlight White Tea)
Harvest: Autumn, 2020
Location: Yangta Village, Jinggu, Yunnan, China
Tea Varietal: Yangta Da Bai Cha

digintea moonshine white tea minicake

Yue Guang Bai (Moonlight White Tea) is a type of tea which appeared on the market in the late 2000s.

It’s not entirely clear whether this type of tea processing was a traditional method or whether whether it was inspired by the white teas of Fuding. Regardless, this type of tea has become quite popular and is now drank throughout the world.

Although Moonlight White Tea is most often considered to be a white tea, it’s interesting to note that some purveyors classify it as a puer tea due to the tea varietal and origin of Yunnan. Perhaps it should be in a category of it’s own, but that would complicate things. However, it’s worth noting that Moonlight White Tea is a tea which ages quite nicely, particularly when it’s been pressed into a tea cake, becoming more like a black tea over time.

Review

The packaging of this tea is very cool, as you get 7 mini-cakes in a nifty little bamboo tong.

In my opinion, they could have individually wrapped the mini-cakes, in addition to the bamboo tong, but the company appears to be about eco-friendly practices, so I am sure they have their reasons why they did it this way.

I broke a tab (1/4) of the tea cake and brewed it in a small glass pitcher, using spring water, and strained through a stainless steel strainer.

I then washed the tea with hot water for 20 seconds and then discarded the rinse.

First Steep

Steeped for 30 seconds.

It produced a relatively dark (for a white tea) amber brew.

Has a slight honey taste, with a bit of earthiness, light floral notes and a little bitterness.

A soft sweetness sticks to the back of the mouth, but it’s not as pronounced as it could be.

Notes of: Meadow hay, field flowers, honey, malt, and astringency.

It almost tastes sort of like a cross between a white and a black tea, which is usual for this type of tea, and is something a lot of people may enjoy.

The leaves haven’t fully opened yet, but it appears that this is not top-grade leaf material, as the leaves are very broken.

They do mention that you may need a strainer for this tea, and they would be correct, I think a strainer might be necessary, but I typically use one anyways, regardless of the type of tea.

Second Steep

Steeped for 40 seconds.

A much darker brew, as it almost looks like a black tea.

Taste is similar to the first steep, but a little stronger and more bitter, while retaining some light honey and floral flavors.

It tastes perhaps a little different then most other Moonlight white teas I have tried, as it’s not quite as sweet or crisp as say, what I have received in the past from Yunnan Sourcing.

Third Steep

Surprisingly this tea brewed an even darker soup this time.

The third steep has a stronger astringency then I expected, with a bit of dryness.

Conclusion

This Moonlight white tea has a broth that resembles a darker tea then it probably should.

It tastes almost as if it has aged a little, but DiginTea states that it was harvested late last year.

It has an enjoyable taste and is definitely drinkable, but in my opinion, overall, it’s a little bitter for a white tea.

It’s not a bad tea. I would even say it’s a good tea, but I can’t say that I liked it as much as some other Moonlight White teas I have drank in the past.